Michael Hicks

A Christmas Carol at Haddonfield Plays and Players

HPP A Christmas CarolThe originality of A Christmas Carol always impressed me. I never would’ve imagined someone spending Christmas alone while haunted by the ghosts of the past, present and future without the use of alcohol. I also found the dramatic presentation of this tale performed by Haddonfield Plays and Players to be equally distinctive. The cast delivered a stellar rendition of this sine qua non of the Holiday season. I attended the December 1, 2017 performance directed by Mark Karcher.

Michael Hicks delivered a haunting performance of a haunted man. Mr. Hicks is a superb and gifted actor. Several years ago I had the pleasure of watching his exceptional interpretation of Dr. Sloper in the Haddonfield Plays and Players production of The Heiress. (Talk about a character that reveled in bitterness and alcohol.) I relished the opportunity to watch his rendition of what began as the most miserable character in literature. This time the role required a transition into a joyous humanitarian. Would Mr. Hicks meet the challenge?

This performer went beyond what many would do in order to get into character. To adopt Scrooge’s appearance he grew mutton chops. He delivered the iconic line “bah, humbug” with suave assurance. Mr. Hicks then craftily brought the audience into the character’s metamorphosis from a self-absorbed miser into a kindly philanthropist. As morose as he portrayed Scrooge at the show’s beginning at the end he became a different character. He demonstrated the laughter and joy of a man impassioned with humanity. Dickens’ character changed dramatically, and Mr. Hicks brought that transformation to life on the Haddonfield Players’ stage.

A Christmas Carol featured an exceptional visual spectacle. I actually heard gasps from the audience when the Ghost of Christmas Past (played by Jennie Pines) made her appearance. Ms. Pines wore a white gown similar to a wedding dress. A strand of bright lights wrapped around her. The theatre became dark. As she descended down the aisle, her entrance created the illusion of an apparition floating from the heavens down to the stage. Then the rotating specks of light against the backdrop simulated snowfall. Ms. Pines costume along with the set combined for a beautiful image of a winter wonderland.

I received an early Christmas Present with Alex Levitt playing the Ghost of Christmas Present. I enjoyed watching this veteran of the Haddonfield Players return to the stage. He applied more range to the role than I would’ve expected. The character began as a jolly and merry soul. Before his exit, he delivered a minatory warning to Scrooge. Mr. Levitt selected a raspy voice in which to do so. The long beard combined with the red robe made him look like Santa Clause. The contrast between his appearance and his delivery made for an interesting scene.

George Clark’s sound design enhanced the atmospherics. The echo effect on Ms. Pines’ voice made her character even more ethereal. When used on Tony Killian’s (as the ghost of Jacob Marley) it made him much more horrifying.

While not the musical version of A Christmas Carol, the dramatic performance still showcased some fantastic singing. Nicky Intrieri (as Tiny Tim) delivered an outstanding unaccompanied solo number. The falsetto choir’s rendition of Holiday staples such as “Hark, the Herald Angels Sing” and “Silent Night” emanated a superb Yuletide spirit.

I’ve written before that I don’t care for narration in live drama. John Mortimer adapted this rendition of A Christmas Carol for the stage. Instead of one story teller he decided that just about every performer should narrate some section of the tale. While I find this type of exposition annoying, in this show I also found much of it unnecessary. The most egregious offenders included:

“Scrooge sees Marley’s face on the door knocker.” A character delivered this line as I watched Scrooge both look at and comment upon Marley’s face on the door knocker.

“Scrooge hears bells.” A narrator said this line while my ears rang (no pun intended) with the sound of myriad bells going off in the theatre.

“Marley walked down the stairs dragging his chains.” This one requires no further explanation.

To all the budding dramatists out there: show or tell. Make a choice. Don’t do both.

I’d like to credit Edwin Howard for putting his power tools to proficient work on the set design. The London backdrop featuring Big Ben, London Bridge and the full moon made great scenery.

It’s also proper to recognize the other performers who rounded out a stellar cast. Their combined efforts delivered a very entertaining evening: Dan Safeer, Jonathan Greenstein, Jay Burton, Tony Killian, Jennifer Flynn, Maddox Mofit-Tighe, Gracie Sokiloff, Brynne Gaffney, Gianna Cosby, Tess Smith, Ryan McDermott, Jake Hufner, John Williams, Isabella Mulliner, John Bravo, Ricky Conway, Anne Buckwheat, Olivia Williams, Jenn Adams, E’Nubian Beckett, Jessi Gollin, Solaida Santiago, and Nadia Faulk.

It’s hard to imagine the Holiday Season without experiencing A Christmas Carol in some form. For those interested in witnessing it performed live, the Haddonfield Players are presenting a great version. That’s no “humbug.” The show runs through December 16th. After that, the Ghost of Christmas Past may just haunt you for not taking advantage of the opportunity.

 

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Theatre Review – Bye Bye Birdie Presented by Haddonfield Plays and Players

Director Jeanne Gold engaged in the most creative casting I’ve ever encountered. For Haddonfield Plays and Players’ summer musical, Bye Bye Birdie, she selected a real life husband and wife team to star in this production. How can an actual married couple portray two people who are dating? I thought. It’s going to be a colossal effort to suspend my disbelief during this show. The performance opened with the two in the midst of a heated argument. Rosie (played by Megan Knowlton Balne) threatened to leave Albert (played by Thomas Balne), in essence, unless he took a more stable job and gave her more attention. After that exchange, I completely bought into the casting decision.

Bye Bye Birdie featured a sophisticated story line for a musical. The amount of conflict impressed me. Rosie Alvarez wanted her boyfriend, Albert Peterson, to sell his company and give up his career managing rock and roll sensation Conrad Birdie (played by Steve Stonis). She also needed him to develop a life of his own away from his overbearing mother. Thanks to Lisa Croce’s spectacular portrayal of the latter, I’m still trying to determine which of these tasks the more challenging.

In addition to this thorn tree in this garden, teenaged Kim MacAfee (performed by Ashleigh Neilio) battled her own series of romantic conflicts. As a young woman discovering her own maturity, she decided to give up her membership in Conrad Birdie’s fan club. She opted to abandon her childhood crush and devote herself to her boyfriend, Hugo (played by Jack Rooney). Serendipitously for theatergoers, just as that moment occurred she received unexpected news from Mr. Peterson’s company. She’d been selected as the young lady with the honor of kissing Conrad Birdie on The Ed Sullivan Show the day before his entering the army.

As I mentioned the two lead performers in this production are married in real life. Since they spend so much time with one another when they’re not on stage, it’s not surprising that they have similar skill sets. Both are extraordinarily strong singers and dancers. They both possess exceptional acting chops, too. Watching the two of them showcase their craft made for a most entertaining evening.

Thomas Balne turned in an amazing performance. His best moment on stage occurred during the upbeat song and dance number “Put on a Happy Face”. The ensemble and he sure made the audience smile. Under choreographer Jennifer Morris Grasso’s direction, they put on a very impressive dance sequence while he sang impeccably.

I also credit Mr. Balne for his crooning of “Baby Talk to Me.” The high notes at the end of the song sounded a bit of out his natural vocal range. He still nailed the notes correctly…on a balmy ninety degree evening, no less. That’s remarkable singing.

Megan Knowlton Balne also conveyed outstanding vocal prowess. A strong performance on an early number, “An English Teacher”, served as a good warm up for the more challenging “Spanish Rose” towards the end of the show. She sang just as proficiently in a Spanish accent as she did with her regular voice. Once again, that’s remarkable singing.

Aside from the great songs, the role called for a very intricate dance number with a group of Shriners. Mrs. Balne’s Rose rose to that challenge, as well. At times I thought the line between dance and gymnastics blurred a bit. It didn’t affect this performer at all.

While Mrs. Balne displayed many strong traits on stage, I found her non-verbal skills without peer. This player can express more emotion with an eye roll than most could with an extended soliloquy. Bravo.

Ashleigh Neilio may only be a freshman in high school, but she displayed the skills of a seasoned stage veteran. Her delivery of “How Lovely to Be a Woman” impressed me. It’s incredible how talented she is at this point in her career. Ms. Neilio sang with great vibrato and sustain. She also caroled with perfect intonation on the high notes. While achieving that difficult feat, she performed the number while changing costumes on stage as she faced the audience. (I can’t even put on a pair of loafers without looking at what I’m doing.) She’s got a bright future in theater. Audiences can look forward to watching Ms. Neilio perform for many years to come.

Steve Stonis (as Conrad Birdie) undoubtedly earned the award for best costumes in this show. The gold suit he wore gave off the colorful attire of a rock star and allowed him the flexibility of movement to out-gyrate Elvis Presley. He also drew laughs during his comedic appearance chugging a bottle of beer while sporting a leopard skin robe. Aside from his fifties crooner style singing, he showed his commitment to playing this character by wearing a pink blouse with a head scarf at the end of the show. That’s dedication.

I’d also like to credit Michael Hicks for his portrayal of Kim’s father. I last saw him play the serious dramatic role of Dr. Sloper in Haddonfield Plays and Players production of The Heiress. He turned in a fantastic performance in a light hearted musical. I’d never heard him sing before. His frustrated delivery of “Kids” and fitting facial expressions suited his character perfectly. Mr. Hicks brilliantly expressed Mr. MacAfee’s antediluvian values (even for a 1950s dad). I appreciated watching him in this comedic role.

I relished observing my friend Lisa Croce reprise her role as Mae Peterson. Ms. Croce once told me that she’d like audiences to remember her as “funny”.  I’m sure she achieved that goal with this group of theatergoers. Her artistic choice of voice suited this role. It fit well with her repeated (and mostly successful) efforts to lay guilt trips on Albert. Her modulation on the not so veiled attacks on Rose made her the perfect antagonist to Mrs. Balne’s character.

I wished the performance could’ve included a live band. As a “purist” I feel that musicians performing along with the people singing make for a better listening experience. All the music was pre-recorded and broadcast over the public address system. I understand that the facility lacked the space to fit the required orchestra for some of the songs, however.

The show began with an off-stage relationship developing into a fictional one on stage. By the end of the performance the true love affair turned out to be between the audience and the cast. (I still noticed a little friction among Ms. Croce’s and Mrs. Balne’s characters, though.) See this show no later than August 6th. After that it’s bye bye Bye Bye Birdie at Haddonfield Plays and Players.

Theatre Review – The Heiress at Haddonfield Plays and Players

Dysfunction. Resentment. Money. Add an element of vengeance to the mix and we’ve got a story. The Haddonfield Plays and Players production of The Heiress included all these qualities. The cast and crew showed the audience that while money can’t buy happiness, it can sure exacerbate a lot of misery.

Admittedly, my expectations for this performance were rather low. William Wyler adapted this 1947 play from Henry James’ Washington Square. Wordy serves as the best word to describe this author’s work. I figured the play would run into the Christmas season.

My second concern involved the casting. In his novel, James described Catherine Sloper as a “dull-looking glutton”. When I saw Marnie Kanarek in the role I felt conflicted. She’s certainly not a “dull-looking glutton”. I struggled to identify her as Catherine at first. While gazing into her big blue eyes through the first scene, I realized that Directors Ed Doyle and Matthew Weil made the right call casting against type here.

Ms. Kanarek delivered a phenomenal performance as Catherine. Through her twitching and hurried talking she portrayed a reticent, socially awkward young woman. By the end of the play she transformed into an angry, bitter and vindictive woman made old well before her years. I applaud her measured transition during the show.

I’m still struggling to find the right word describing her facial expressions during the final scene. While doing needlepoint, she had this look like she was going to slash and stab the tapestry. As I sat in the front row, the house manager’s pre-performance announcement that “those close to the stage may get closer to the action than they wish” gave me a chill.

I also have to credit Ms. Kanarek for Catherine’s meltdown during the second scene in Act Two. This mental breakdown was one for the ages. Screaming she tore open her suitcase. Flailing her arms she hurled clothes all over the stage. (I didn’t envy Narci Regina, in the role of the maid, the task of cleaning up this mess.) I probably would’ve called 911 had I not been seated so close to the stage. She scared me.

From reading the playbill, singing is Ms. Kanarek’s strength. That surprised me as The Heiress lacked musical numbers. She displayed outstanding acting chops throughout the entire performance. I can’t emphasize that enough to give her the credit she deserves.

Tyler Reed did a great job courting Catherine in his role as Morris Townsend. This character reminded me a bit of Fr. Flynn from John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt. Reed played a suave, smooth-talker with an answer for everything. Was he really after Catherine’s money? Did he truly love her? Could he be trusted? When Dr. Sloper (played by Michael Hicks) accused him of being “mercenary”, he calmly rebutted. He always did so by telling his accusers exactly what they wanted to hear. What a coincidence. Or wasn’t it?

Reed also performed well in Townsend’s scenes with Aunt Livinia. (Played by Phyllis Pomerantz.) His charming laughter and wit made me think he wanted to win her over. Then again, maybe he did. His behavior certainly encouraged her myriad matchmaking machinations.

Henry James once wrote, “I’ve always been interested in people, but I’ve never liked them.” Dr. Sloper (played by Michael Hicks) embodied this world view. I liked Hick’s interpretation of the character; particularly the way he tilted his head back whenever he sat in his chair. In keeping with the role, he delivered his lines in a staccato, machine gun like barrage. In his talented hands, Dr. Sloper became austere, unemotional and analytical. He freely expressed his resentment towards Catherine. (Her mother died shortly after giving birth to her.) Not the best qualities for someone raising an insecure daughter.

Mr. Hicks displayed another of the doctor’s bad qualities when holding a glass of brandy during every scene. Yes, you read that right. The doctor had a brandy every scene. I guess the standards for physicians in 1850s New York were more lax than the current ones. Did I mention he had a brandy in every scene? I’m surprised Dr. Sloper didn’t contract cirrhosis of the liver during the show.

The thespians conducted themselves very professionally. As we all know, technical glitches happen on occasion. During a crucial discussion between Ms. Kanarek and Mr. Ross the lights flickered for several minutes. These two actors weren’t distracted. They remained focused and got through the scene flawlessly. The blinking diverted my attention a few times. I really applaud their ability in not allowing this snafu to inhibit their performances.

I did have one criticism of the show. All the actors spoke fast. (As I wrote above: I thought Mr. Hicks’ delivery consistent with his character. After all: the faster Dr. Sloper got the words out, the faster he could drink more brandy.) In fact, several performers tripped over their words a few times. I figured they talked this way to reflect the speaking patterns of upper class New Yorkers in 1850. To be fair, I didn’t have any trouble hearing or understanding anything said on stage. In addition, everyone in the cast spoke with perfect diction. At no point in the show did I notice any mispronunciations. That’s a great accomplishment when speaking quickly.

F. Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, “The rich are different than the rest of us.” After watching The Heiress, I sure hope that’s right. While money may not buy happiness, it can get you a few hours of stellar entertainment at Haddonfield Plays and Players. The Heiress runs through May 23rd.