Jenny Scudder

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead at Burlington County Footlighters

This is not an easy show, as director Alex Davis prefaced her remarks in the playbill. That’s a trenchant point. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead included themes from the disciplines of rhetoric, philosophy and mathematics. Add to that some Shakespearean dialog and an approach to action that made sitting through a Beckett play seem like watching the X-Games. Some would argue that Tom Stoppard produced the theatrical equivalent to Jerry Seinfeld’s “show about nothing.” Whatever one’s take, I’m sure most would agree it makes for some pretty deep theatre. I attended the opening night performance on November 2nd at Burlington County Footlighters.

High minded dialog combined with stretches where little action occurs puts a lot of pressure on the actors. Ms. Davis selected the perfect duo for this challenge with Josh Ireland and Matt Dell’Olio.

One of the key precepts of writing is to hook the reader with the first sentence. The same goes for drama. Mr. Stoppard proved himself quite the iconoclast. This show began with two characters discussing the results of coin tosses for several minutes. That forced the actors to interest the audience through their histrionic skills alone. Mr. Ireland and Mr. Dell’Olio deserve great respect for meeting this challenge.

The conversations seemed to shift topic randomly. While ostensibly about dry subjects on the surface, it contained serious philosophical undertones. The dialog even modulated into Shakespearean language during several scenes. Once again: Mr. Ireland and Mr. Dell’Olio didn’t allow the difficult material to impede their performances.

Mr. Ireland played a spirited Rosencrantz. In addition to his natural means of speaking, he displayed the perfect gestures. At times they reflected my own confusion with some of Mr. Stoppard’s complex dialog.

Mr. Ireland showed poise when a miscue occurred. During the opening scene one of the coins rolled into the audience. He leapt off the stage, said, “Excuse me”, took it from the spectator who had it, and resumed playing the scene. Even during this unexpected incident, he remained in character.

In 2016 Mr. Dell’Olio took delivering a soliloquy to a new level. In Dead Man’s Cell Phone he made the selfish justifications of a narcissist sound as weighty as Hamlet’s “To Be or Not to Be” oration. It seemed fitting that he’d play a role that interacted with the same character who delivered it.

Mr. Dell’Olio treated audiences to another sublime performance. He showed exceptional stage presence as Guildenstern. Mr. Dell’Olio displays a method of speaking that makes even the commonplace sound profound. Through his gestures he brings powerful emotion to his roles. It’s a testament to his abilities that even this material didn’t restrain him from delivering a Matt Dell’Olio style performance.

As The Player, Dennis Doherty delivered the funniest line of the show. “We’re actors! We’re the opposite of people!” Mr. Doherty also brought out one of the script’s most serious themes. His character demonstrated the subtext that explored the relationship between reality and art. Mr. Doherty executed both the humorous and serious attributes of this character brilliantly.

It’s quite an achievement to make madness and a hunger for vengeance comical. Enter John Hager. He transformed Hamlet into one of the funniest characters I’ve seen performed on stage. Mr. Hager selected the perfect voice for the role. Through his eccentric mannerisms, he made the audience laugh even when not speaking.

Performers Howard Goldberg, Jenny Scudder, David Rizzo, Liz Baldwin, Courtney Bundens, Joshua Kurtz, John Salera and Michael Mueller rounded out the cast.

This high minded show became a high tech spectacle. Jim Frazer’s set and lighting design established a perfect setting for the dramatic action. The use of projections and lighting created flawless impressions of nighttime and daybreak. Amanda Cogdell’s period costuming transformed the stage into a replica of seventeenth century Denmark.

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead made for an evening of sophisticated theatre. Ms. Davis added:

You could look at it through the lens of existentialism, questioning whether or not these men truly are free to choose their own paths, or if their fate is sealed and, in turn question your own reality, and whether or not YOU choose your own destiny.

The show may not be “easy”, but the choice to see it is. For those allowing fate to decide whether they should, flip a coin: preferably one of Rosencrantz’s. For South Jersey theatregoers who prefer to control their own destinies, the show runs through November 17th at Burlington County Footlighters. After that it meets the same fate as Rosencrantz and Guildenstern…and Hamlet…and Ophelia…and Polonius…and Claudius…

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Seussical at Burlington County Footlighters

What better way to spend an evening having fun

Than seeing a musical inspired by the power of imagination?

I found this one more amusing than Mother Goose.

Oh, the thinks you can think when it comes to Seuss.

 

Okay, no one will ever confuse my writing with Mr. Geisel’s. Lest his fans become too distraught by my weak imitation, the Footlighters cast and crew proved much more adept at carrying on his legacy. I attended the premiere of Seussical on September 15, 2017.

 

When I opened the program I was delighted to see

It was directed by theatrical guru Dennis Doherty.

I watched the show before going to bed,

Now these rhyming couplets are stuck in my head!

 

Ugh! Well, I don’t often attend performances that inspire me to imitate the characters’ speech patterns. That shows the quality of this production.

Patrick O’Malley turned in an animated performance as that troublemaking tabby, The Cat in the Hat. The fast paced strutting about the stage with either his hands on his hips or clasping the inside of his jacket deftly mimicked character’s mannerisms.

Of course, the role required a flair for comedy. Mr. O’Malley captured the character’s arch nature. While approaching the sleeping JoJo he placed his finger to his lips to shush the audience. He mimed a sleeping position to show the child slumbered. Then he bellowed, “WAKE UP!”

This demanding part included several complex song and dance numbers. He dazzled with the ironically titled “How Lucky You Are.” The deft way he utilized the cane enhanced the routine. He also did a superb job teaming up with the Hunches on “Havin’ a Hunch.”

Seussical featured the best dance routines I’ve observed. Choreographer Liz Baldwin did phenomenal work coordinating them. Since many of them included several performers, it made the numbers much more intricate. The company impressed me by staying in synch and executing these complex dances so well.

Tre DeLuca shone in an impressive performance as JoJo. He transformed his character from a naïve boy into a mature young man throughout the evening. He served as a great foil to the autocratic General Gengus Khan Schmitz (Suzie Ramsdell) and displayed great chemistry with Mr. O’Malley. I liked his enactment of perplexity when Mr. and Mrs. Mayor (Michael Sheldon and Jenny Scudder) chastised him for “thinking” too much.

Mr. DeLuca delivered memorable singing. He performed a somber rendition on the reprise of “Alone in the Universe.” Duets made up all his other numbers. His high vocals complimented the other ranges. He rounded out the harmonies very well.

Brian Padla turned in a moving performance as the sensitive elephant, Horton. During the first part of the show, he “heard a Who” on a speck of dust. He placed it on top of a clover. While the residents of Whoville performed at the other side of the stage, he listened. His facial expressions captured the feelings of someone enraptured by what he heard.

His non-verbal skills accentuated Mr. Padla’s vocal capabilities. He best combined those strengths on “Here on Who” accompanied by the residents of Whoville.

Under the musical direction of Peg Smith, Seussical featured many stellar vocal performances. Jill Bradshaw sang movingly in her renditions of “The One Feather Tail of Miss Gertrude McFuzz” and “Notice Me, Horton.” Alex Davis belted out “Amayzing Mayzie” and “Mayzie in Palm Beach” like a seasoned cabaret singer. Kendra Hecker delivered awesome vocals on the soulful sections of “Biggest Blame Fool” and “The People Versus Horton the Elephant.”

I’ve written before about how Burlington County Footlighters likes to bring the audience into their shows. When Brian Bacon and Mark Urmson joined together for the catchy “Monkey Around” they danced down the aisles with Horton in pursuit.

Playwrights Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens didn’t spare any performer dialog laden with rhyming couplets. In their roles as the Mayor and Mrs. Mayor, Michael Sheldon and Jenny Scudder had the most difficult. In the scene where they confronted JoJo about his “thinking”, they alternated rhyming couplets. I credit them for not allowing the word patterns to distract them. They also crooned a moving rendition of “Solla Sollew” along with Mr. Padla and Mr. DeLuca.

I enjoyed JP Helk’s baritone rendition of the Grinch’s voice. I enjoyed it even more when he used it to deliver his jaded rendition of the Grinch’s Christmas story to the Whos.

As always, Jim Frazer did an exceptional job with the set design. Mr. Frazer’s talents make the “willing suspension of disbelief” very easy for audience members. This time he transformed the Footlighters stage into the surreal world of Seuss; ranging from the Jungle of Noor to Whoville to the Circus McGurkus.

Amanda Codgell’s costuming enriched the show. The attire conveyed the characters’ personalities while staying true to Dr. Seuss. At the same time, it didn’t overshadow the performers wearing it. Ms. Codgell did some very inspired work with red bows, such as The Cat in the Hat’s tie and the dual bows on Mazie’s stockings. Mazie’s and Gertrude’s feathers enhanced those characters’ appearance. The Cat’s iconic hat was spot on.

I’d also credit performers Liz Baldwin, Julia Fraupel, Alyssa LaPierre, Suzie Ramsdell, Gabriella Kelsey, Michaelina Petti, Tristan Codgell, Max Hann, Morgan Hann and Harrison Scudder for their contributions to the production.

It didn’t surprise that a show based on imagination would bring together so many creative people. Seussical transported the power of “the thinks you can think” to the stage. The Footlighters cast and crew made it a reality. They put on one “amayzing” show.

Just because you’re a Seuss fan doesn’t make you nerdy,

Go see Seussical at Footlighters before it ends September 30.

Theatre Review – Dead Man’s Cell Phone at Burlington County Footlighters

It’s rare to witness that unique combination of themes such as technological obsession, the search for true love and the business of organ trafficking in the same show. Somehow, Burlington County Footlighters melded these disparate concepts in their production of Sarah Ruhl’s Dead Man’s Cell Phone. Under the direction of theatre guru extraordinaire, Dennis Doherty, they did an exceptional job in the process.

Mr. Doherty’s choice for his latest project didn’t surprise me. It featured a host of really unusual and quirky characters. The ensemble reminded me a bit of roles in The Drowsy Chaperone; in which this summer at the Maple Shade Arts Council Mr. Doherty played the Man in the Chair. This time he swapped that seat for the director’s chair. When I attended the opening night performance on November 4, 2016, it made me glad he did.

For those who haven’t guessed from the dramatis personae, the playwright crafted an atypical story for this 2006 work. Ironically, it opened with a very relatable scene all too ubiquitous in the modern world. While sitting in a café, Jean (played by Alex Davis) became annoyed by a cell phone ringing behind her. When the man (Matt Dell’Olio) ignored her entreaties to answer it, she removed it from his pocket and responded for him. In the process of speaking, she discovered he was dead. After reporting his death, she opted to keep his phone and continue answering his calls. In the process she became acquainted with his brother (also played by Matt Dell’Olio), his mother (played by Jenny Scudder), his widow (played by Amanda Lizzio) and a business associate (played by Danica Harvey). Each of these individuals seemed in competition for who could be the most eccentric.

I’ve seen Alex Davis play numerous supporting roles. (She’s also a veteran of The Drowsy Chaperone.) I enjoyed watching her take the lead role in this one. It required her to carry the show and she met the challenge. Since her character didn’t know anything about the dead man, she had to talk her way through conversations with people who knew him intimately. This resulted in some awkward discussions. It’s never easy to ameliorate nervous tension through comedy, but she did so like a true theatrical professional.

Ms. Davis is very expressive with a strong aptitude for non-verbal communication. I liked the way she opened the performance by raising an eyebrow while the cell phone in the café increasingly annoyed her. She did a nice job displaying confusion while trying to explain to Gordon’s (the dead man’s) family that she worked for him in “incoming.” At the time neither the character nor the audience knew that he facilitated organ trafficking.

Matt Dell’Olio played dual roles in this show. His performance captured the essences of both the cunning narcissistic dead man as well as his timid awkward brother, Dwight. He brilliantly delivered the dead man’s soliloquy to open Act II. In the speech, the character explained how he pursued a selfish, self-absorbed existence motivated by personal gain. His speaking technique made me feel like I was listening to Hamlet’s “To Be or Not to Be” oration. That’s quite an achievement under any circumstance. It’s even more remarkable because of the content.

I liked how Mr. Dell’Olio transformed into the timid Dwight; in some instances after playing Gordon in the preceding scene. He got into character by slouching and through some graceless laughing. With measured precision he developed a socially awkward character into Jane’s love interest.

The supporting performers portrayed their characters in ways that enhanced the play. Jenny Scudder nailed the role of the overly dramatic mother, Mrs. Gottleib. I found Amanda Lizzio’s rendition of Gordon’s widow as intoxicating as her character was intoxicated. Danica Harvey created a wonderful sense of mystery regarding Gordon’s “other woman.”

Jim Frazier did awesome work with both the set and lighting design. The contrast between the light blue and black colors underneath the multicolored lights created a very unique effect: both simple and yet abstract; just like the play itself. The combination enhanced the unusual nature of the story.

Sarah Ruhl wrote a very cerebral text for this piece. It required a lot of thought to absorb its nuances and themes. At times during the show the air conditioner activated and made it difficult to hear the performers. (Yes, even those of us in South Jersey need air conditioning in November from time-to-time.) It also distracted me from contemplating the show’s complexities. Given the choice between feeling cool and hearing the performance, I would’ve preferred the latter. Iggy Pop bled for his art. I’m willing to shed some sweat for Footlighters’.

I saw Dennis Doherty on his cell phone after the performance. That showed me just how into this project he is. Judging from the laughter and applause, I’d have to say the audience was even more into it than he. Then again no one can accuse anybody associated with the performance of phoning it in. See it no later than November 19th. After that Dead Man’s Cell Phone goes dead at Footlighters and redial won’t be available.