Gary Kochey

Act 1 Scene 1 One-Act Festival Weekend at The Village Playbox

South Jersey contains a lot of artistic talent. To provide a forum for these creatives to practice their crafts, many community theatre companies feature play festivals for amateur playwrights. These events tend to last one evening and conclude after just a few hours.

The team at the Village Playbox decided to make their play festival just that: a festival. Their Act 1 Scene 1 One-Act Festival Weekend occurred over three nights and featured twenty shows. I attended the performances on Thursday, September 12th, Friday, September 13th and Saturday, September 14th.

With that much time and material, it wasn’t surprising that the plays covered a wide range of subject matter. Ryan Kaminski’s The Meadow (directed by Jennifer Evans) related the story of a woman who hired a private detective to investigate her husband. She suspected both his infidelity and that he wanted to murder her. Jason Pollock’s The Caterer (which he also directed) portrayed a caterer who lacked customer service skills, but had some interesting ideas about keeping his marriage vibrant. Jennifer Wilson wrote and directed Conceit; a piece that explored the perils of narcissism.

The plays presented addressed some topical issues.

We live in an era when many Americans fear losing their jobs to robotics. Playwright Cooper Gorelic applied this concern to the domain of theater in Fifth Ed. Performers Stephen Kreal, Donna Supulski and Kacper Miklus portrayed a world where even actors aren’t immune from this phenomenon. Gary Kochley directed.

The program also included serious dramatic works.

Heidi Mae’s Black Friday surveyed one of modern society’s scourges. Performers Amy Bannister, Ariel Golan, and Kacper Miklus explored the difficult decision a woman must make about coming forward as a victim of sexual assault. Chrissy Wick directed.

Ms. Mae explained that this piece serves as Act II of a three part drama she’s crafted. I found the Black Friday segment strong enough for presentation on its own.

The measured pacing added to the story’s tension. It opened with two women recounting the events of Thanksgiving night. What began as funny recollections of an evening of hard drinking steadily transitioned into darker reminiscences. The dual meanings of the title enhanced the story’s meaning.

The festival contained several comedic pieces.

Kevin Stephany contributed a comical take on the most despicable form of life ever to inhabit the Earth: the blogging community theatre critic. In The Director Becomes the Critic Steve Allen took on the role of a director struggling to respond to a barrage of so-called “ideas” from a community theatre critic. Gregory Furman played the latter. Jenn Evans directed.

Heidi Mae wrote and directed a one-person version of Meeting Heaven for this festival. Performer Michelle Tomko played multiple roles in this tale of unrequited love in a strange love triangle.

The five person cast of Meeting Heaven made the top seven finalists at The Ritz Theatre’s 10-Minute Comedy Play Festival in June of 2019. I was curious to see how Ms. Mae would organize this play with only one actor.

Ms. Tomko took the audience on the narrator’s voyage through states of exhilaration, bliss and disappointment. She did so while reciting all the story’s dialog and narration herself. While doing so the performer added the appropriate gestures and facial expressions to enrich the tale. I also enjoyed her clever use of the Panama hat as a prop.

Ms. Mae’s text contained a host of lyrical flourishes. My favorites included:

            She wore what angels wore on their day off.

            If I had a dollar for every dame who played Emily in Our Town I wouldn’t have to write anymore.

            Meeting Heaven put me in Hell.

Cooper Gorelick gave the audience a dose of dark humor in Post Mortem. For this piece, the audience accompanied a man (played by D. Michael Farley) from his last trip to the hospital through his corpse’s journey to its final resting place. Cara Dickinson and Hayley Melvin added their comedic skills to the cast. Ashley Bianchimano directed.

Tom Chin presented a comical spin on the power of reverse psychology with Hello Again. Doug Cohen directed this tale of a cold calling salesman (played by Kevin Dahm) using unorthodox means to sell to his customer (played by Jenn Evans).

Mr. Chin also contributed two other pieces to the festival. Doug Cohen also directed the poignant The Bright Red Popsicle Sticks about two elderly women ruminating on the trials of love. Gary Kochey directed the comedy of two brothers out for dinner at a Chinese restaurant in Won Ton.

Cooper Gorelick put a twist on an old cliché by showing that all is fair in love and love of pie through his comical piece Pie Fight. It featured performers Ashley Bianchimano (who also directed), Cara Dickinson and Haley Melvin. These players last shared the stage together in the farcical piece Noises Off! presented by the Village Playbox in February 2019. The trio carried over the slapstick hijinks from that show into Mr. Gorelick’s piece.

No theatrical festival would be complete without serious dramatic pieces. The Village Playbox included memorable plays in this one.

Kevin Stephany’s Family Reunion concluded the opening night performance. Chrissy Wick directed the real life father and son team of Steve Allen and Kyle Allen in this story of an estranged father and son reunited at the wife/mother’s deathbed.

In the interest of full disclosure, I should inform readers that the person writing this review is the same Kevin Stephany who wrote the play. While it sounds cliché, I like to think of myself as my own toughest critic. Steve Allen’s performance made it difficult for me to find flaws with this show.

Two weeks before the play festival, Steve Allen wrote in a Facebook post:

Even though the play is only 10 minutes long, it has been the most emotionally draining and challenging experience in my theatre life.

Following the performance he added:

It may have only been 10 minutes long, it may have only been acting, but the emotion was real.

So was the passion he brought to the role.

To paraphrase something I mentioned to Mr. Allen after the show: I wrote the play. I knew the story. I still felt uncomfortable watching it. That’s a testament to the skill of Steve, Kyle and Ms. Wick.

Both Steve and Kyle executed the myriad pauses in the script perfectly. Their proficient enactments of them added even more tension to the conflict between the characters.

It would figure that the best parts of something I wrote would be the sections without any words.

Erin Blackwell’s Hey El? followed the relationship of two sisters as one suffered from cancer. Chal Gallagher, Carol Furphy-Labinsky and Erin Blackwell brought strong emotions into this moving drama. Their skilled portrayals allowed me to feel the sensations of love and loss between the characters. John Blackwell directed.

Prolific playwright Joseph A. Dewan contributed six pieces to the festival. He directed all of them.

Border contained an outstanding surprise mid-way through the story. In the interest of avoiding spoilers, I won’t mention it here.

Mr. Dewan wrote an excellent version of a spy vs. spy story. He included a good balance of intrigue and romance to make it more engaging.

In Exchange, Kacper Miklus and Amy Bannister played undercover agents during the Cold War; he from the United States and she from the Soviet Union. As part of a goodwill program sponsored by their governments they exchanged presents for the Holiday Season. During their ensuing conversation they discovered they had much more in common than just their occupations.

Mr. Dewan crafted a heartwarming story with a delightful twist in Nosey. Joseph Chialastri played an embittered former clown confined to a hospital bed. Ariel Golan took on the role of a candy striper tasked with lightening his mood.

Sheltered was another well written piece. The plot contained exceptional conflict. Mr. Dewan played a bitter miser opposite Amy Bannister’s bubbly animal adoption agent. Stephen Kreal completed the cast on this entertaining tale about the redemptive power of pets.

Two one act monologues also appeared in Mr. Dewan’s repertoire. The playwright showed a lot of creativity with The C Word. In addition to the attention getting title a preacher served as the lone character. The plot contained an excellent twist when the narrator revealed the actual C word.

In Smoke, Mr. Dewan didn’t simply lead his character through a range of emotions. He enacted the entire scope of the human experience. That’s quite a feat for a one act monologue.

I’d also credit the Village Playbox for the clever bit of subliminal advertising they worked into the program. Jennifer Wilson let out a high pitched scream at the end of Conceit. Her vocal range reminded me a bit of Deep Purple’s legendary front man Ian Gillian’s.

As theatre fans know, Mr. Gillian also played the role of Jesus Christ in the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar. The Village Playbox will be presenting the theatrical version of it in May of 2020. Could they have included a prelude of the vocal stylings it will showcase into their play festival?

The Village Playbox production team included Producer Lauren Fabbri-Picerno, Stage Manager Mandi Heims and Gary Kochey on sound and lighting. The following completed the cast of actors who performed in the festival: Joey Bianchimano, Mary Corr Dewan, Sheila MacDonald, Jason Pollock, Thom Reese, Jessica Allen Shockley, Dee Stenton, Chrissy Wick, Jen Wilson and Nikki Zane.

Friday the 13th may be an unlucky day for some, but the Village Playbox made it and the days around it lucky ones for theatre fans, actors and playwrights. It showed all of us how lucky we are to live in such an artistically vibrant area as South Jersey.

 

 

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Seussical at The Village Playbox

The Village Playbox proved that imagination isn’t just for kids. Using Seussical’s opening number “Oh, The Thinks You Can Think” as inspiration, Director Anita Rowland along with the cast and crew used all their powers of creativity to bring this show to the stage. The script required that they transform the set into the worlds of Whoville, the Jungle of Nool and into the realm of everyone’s favorite troublemaking tabby, The Cat in the Hat. I attended the Saturday, May 4th performance at the First Presbyterian Church of Haddon Heights.

To borrow a line from The Cat in the Hat, “Folks, this ain’t Mother Goose.” Upon encountering The Cat in the Hat (Sidney Manfred Maycock III) Young Jojo (Presley Terch) took an amazing journey. The Cat transported him to the miniature world of Whoville. In this place, he became the son of the Mayor (Doug Cohen) and Mrs. Mayor (Debbi Heckman). A teacher chastised Jojo for using his imagination too much. In order to discipline the boy, the Mayor and Mrs. Mayor placed him in the army. General Genghis Khan Schmitz (Christopher Schmalbach) vowed to make him conform.

Horton the Elephant (Shawn Simmons) discovered Whoville on a speck of dust. He placed it on a clover for safety. First the Wickersham Brothers (a group of monkeys) and then Vlad Vladicoff the eagle (Steve Allen) took the clover. The latter dropped it into a clover patch.

Horton’s quest to relocate Whoville became interrupted by Mazie LaBird (Rachel Smith). She asked Horton to sit on her nest for “an afternoon.” After Horton agreed, Mazie abandoned her egg.

A group of hunters captured Horton and placed him in the Circus McGurkus.  Gertrude McFuzz (Haley Schmalback), another bird, struggled to locate Horton’s clover for him. Her desire for his affections served as her motivation.

This plot summary doesn’t adequately explain the level of imagination needed to present Seussical. Much to their credit, the team at The Village Playbox made this fantastical premise very believable.

Director Rowland utilized the entire room for this production. During several numbers, the ensemble left the stage and performed in the rows surrounding the audience. I liked the stereo effect it provided. It also allowed those in the show to interact with the audience. During one number The Cat made eye contact with me as he passed. “Now there’s a man who likes to mambo,” he said to me.

I normally don’t like it when performers break the fourth wall. In this case I felt flattered that someone acknowledged my ruffled shirt. I paid good money for that thing.

Donna Allen, Nikki Zane and Amy Bannister did an excellent job with the elaborate costuming. As someone who’s color blind, even I could appreciate their intricate use of color. The Cat’s bright colored red and white striped hat looked authentic. The different shades of the Bird Girl costumes added a nice visual effect against the varying hues of the backdrop. The yellows worn by the Mayor and his wife enhanced the cartoonish ambiance.

Jan Johnston performed extraordinary work designing the set. Even though based on a fantasy world, I found it very realistic. The stage became the domain of Dr. Seuss. The cartoon trees looked as though they’d been transplanted out of the pages of his books. Mazie’s nest perched several feet above the stage. In front of it was a multi colored clover field. Credit goes to Gary Kochey and Christine Dziczek for constructing this wonderful set.

In addition to transforming the theatre into the world of Dr. Seuss, I also thought musical director John Demchak and choreographer Haley Schmalbach turned Haddon Heights into Motown. The numbers included sophisticated melodies, elaborate background vocals and stellar dance moves. Jessica Shockley delivered soulful vocals on “Biggest Blame Fool” and during “The People Versus Horton the Elephant.” Rachel Smith sang a sultry version of “Amazing Mazie” accompanied by Haley Schmalbach, Haley Melvin, Nikki Zane, Jayne Colotti and Madeline Johnson.

Upon seeing Sidney Maycock’s in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels I wrote that he possessed a genius for comedy. With his performance in Seussical, he personified Arthur Schopenhauer’s observation that, “Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.”

Mr. Maycock took a high-energy approach to a demanding role. He spent most of the show on stage; either pantomiming reactions or leading the action. The entire evening he wore a fur covered cat suit. I attended on a humid night. Mr. Maycock never showed any signs of fatigue. He pranced around the room like a performer impassioned with his role.

When Act Two opened, The Cat impersonated an orchestra conductor. During the scene, the character sat down out of exhaustion, took a drink of water and patted his forehead with a towel. Mr. Maycock put a lot of energy into that maneuver, too.

Mr. Maycock utilized a series of voices for the role. Employing a Texas accent he ran an auction. He mimicked a doctor with a Russian dialect. Using The Cat’s voice he performed excellent renditions of “Oh, The Thinks You Can Think” and “It’s Possible” with Presley Terch and “How Lucky You Are.”

Seussical included many outstanding musical numbers. Shawn Simmons and Mr. Terch sang the most beautiful song in the score. They sang a beautiful rendition of  “Alone in the Universe.” Mr. Simmons and Haley Schmalbach delivered an equally poignant version of the track towards the end of Act Two.

I marvel at the barrage of rhyming couplets playwrights Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty included in the script. The most challenging came during Mr. and Mrs. Mayor’s initial interaction with Jojo. Doug Cohen and Debbi Heckman impressed by delivering these tricky tongue twisters clearly and without stumbling over the words.

I found one concept in the show dated. General Genghis Khan Schmitz launched a war against people who buttered the bottom side of their toast. With the current state of American foreign policy, that concept won’t seem as bizarre to American audiences as it did when Seussical first appeared in 2000.

The show contained an extensive cast. I’d like to compliment everyone for their work on this production: Sidney Maycock, Shawn Simmons, Haley Melvin, Nikki Zane, Jayne Collotti, Madeline Johnston, Aaron Wachs, Paul Rather, Gabrielle Allen, Daniel McDevitt, Steve Allen, Lily Allen, Colin Becker, Margo Mullin, Amy Bannister, Jennifer Campbell, Rachel Grodzielanek, Madelyn Grodzalinek, Nicolette Malinowski, Audrey Mitros, Juliette Pacana, Ella Samuel-Siegal and William Young. Steve Allen assistant directed and Ed Frazer designed the lights.

Seussical played to a sold out house during its opening weekend. If you haven’t seen it, I’ll bet you feel “alone in the universe.” I’m “havin’ a hunch” you’d like to watch it. Before saying, “how lucky you are” to those who have, get your tickets now. Don’t “monkey around.”

So don’t you lament and come to grief.

See Seussical at the Village Playbox no later than May 18th.

Noises Off at the Village Playbox

Director Valerie Brothers explained to me that farces are “a lot of hard work” following a run of The Fox on the Fairway. The Village Playbox proved just how incisive Ms. Brothers was. I attended the February 8th performance of Noises Off. John Blackwell directed this rendition of Michael Frayn’s comical take on the theatre business.

Noises Off reminded me a bit of the film This is Spinal Tap. Like the fictitious rock band, Mr. Frayn’s made-up theatre company just couldn’t seem to execute any task properly.

The show told the story of a travelling theatre troupe in their quest to perform a comical play called Nothing On. As the tour wore on, this lighthearted comedy became a serious drama: backstage. Increasingly that drama started making its way into the main production. While the patrons attending Nothing On may not have been impressed, the audience for Noises Off was delighted.

As witty as I found the show, the set made for the most memorable aspect of Noises Off. Watching the crew make the adjustments to the set entertained me as much as the show itself. The performance contained three acts. Acts I and III featured the set of the play-within-a-play: the living room of the Brent’s country home. For Act II, the crew converted the set into the backstage of the theatre. Somehow the crew changed the stage into the second set in less than 15 minutes during the first intermission. During the second intermission, they transformed the stage back to the original setting from Act I.

After the show, Mr. Blackwell told me, “I didn’t think we could do it.” He and the crew deserve great accolades for this accomplishment. Producer Rob Kristie, Assistant Director Steve Allen, Stage Manager/Line Director Ariel Golan, Erin Gallagher on stage crew, and set constructor Gary Kochey along with the cast members who helped move everything around all did a phenomenal job completing this difficult task.

There’s an old adage that “in comedy, timing is everything.” In conjunction with the set changes, the cast members performed an extraordinary job with their timing. Each act of Noises Off entailed the performers acting out the same material from Act I of Nothing On. When the actors did so in Act II they delivered their lines from off stage most of the time. The audience could only see the events occurring backstage. Mr. Blackwell coordinated and the cast fulfilled these challenging maneuvers flawlessly. In Act III when the tempers flared, the Nothing On cast forgot their lines and production fell apart, the performers still remained in-synch.

Esteemed actress and director Lisa Croce once told me that she “keeps her drama on the stage.” The characters in Noises Off would have been well advised to take Ms. Croce’s advice.

I often compliment directors for selecting the right performers to fit the show’s roles. I would make the same observation about Mr. Blackwell for this one. The same could not be said regarding the fictitious director, Lloyd (played by Chal Gallagher). Lloyd’s casting choices did reflect the quality of his judgement, however. During the run, he dated both Stage Manager Poppy (played by Ashley Bianchimano) and female lead Brooke (Haley Melvin).

The conflicts didn’t end there. Garry, the male lead, (Scott Partenheimer) and Dotty (Phyllis Josephson) engaged in a troubled love affair of their own. Frederick (D. Michael Farley) had a propensity for nose bleeds and lightheadedness. Selsdon (Tom Lorenz) was a chronic alcoholic. Belinda (Cara Dickinson) had a sarcastic way of ending sentences with either the words “my love” or “my sweet.” Stage Manager and male understudy, Tim (Evan Hairston), took the brunt of the director’s frustration with the cast.

Not an ideal situation for a group presenting a theatrical production. Witnessing their antics did make for a very entertaining evening for theatregoers, however.

Due to the complexity of the musical routines in Rent, I wondered if Jonathan Larsen hated actors. Because of the physical demands of Noises Off, I wonder if Mr. Frayn had his own issues with them.

Noises Off included a lot of slapstick. Scott Partenheimer delivered a masterful comedic display. He performed physical comedy reminiscent of the great Tim Conway. Mr. Partenheimer fell down a flight of stairs, slipped on a sardine falling on his back and even hopped around the stage with both his shoelaces tied together.

Michael Farley also displayed some stellar dexterity. He maintained his balance while hopping around the stage with his pants around his ankles.

Phyllis Josephson showed her skill at physical comedy as well. Ms. Josephson walked the entire length of the stage with a telephone wire caught around her ankle.

I doubt the playwright intended this, but I’d pay tribute to the cast members who met the unique environmental challenge this performance presented. Chal Gallagher, Tom Lorenz, D. Michael Farley and Haley Melvin all performed scenes in their underwear. While this type of costuming is a boon for producers, it can challenge actors; especially on a winter evening in South Jersey with the temperature in the 30s. One has to respect these performers’ dedication to their craft.

Noises Off also included some memorable performances. It seemed as though Mr. Partenheimer and Ms. Melvin competed to determine whose character could overact more.

It was also a pleasure to watch Phyllis Josephson play a role I didn’t think she would be capable of playing: that of a bad actress. She did so wonderfully. That’s a true testament to her skill as a performer.

Comedy can be serious business. Noises Off showed it. The multifarious antics involving so many performers made them difficult to absorb in one viewing. As with Spinal Tap, I feel like if I watched Noises Off a dozen times, I’d still catch things I hadn’t noticed before.

It’s doubtful this cast and crew will take Noises Off on the road to Trenton, Harrisburg and Akron. The Village Playbox will present it through February 16th.