Francis B. Pedersen

The Tin Woman at Bridge Players Theatre Company

The Bridge Players Theatre Company is commemorating Valentine’s Day with heart this year. They are doing so through their presentation of Sean Grennan’s The Tin Woman. Alice Weber directed this absorbing reflection on loss and second chances. Your correspondent attended the Saturday, February 8th performance.

Director Weber has a reputation for selecting thought-provoking projects. The Tin Woman is her most captivating to date.

For those unfamiliar with Mr. Grennan’s drama, think David Lindsey-Abaire’s Rabbit Hole, only with much more tension. Joy (played by Gina Petti) recently received a heart transplant. The experience of coming so close to death led her to reflect upon her life. Failed relationships, a mediocre job and lack of fulfilment made it an unpleasant recollection. She became plagued by guilt that someone had to die so that she could live.

Meanwhile, Jack’s (Francis B. Pedersen’s) family endured their own sorrows. His parents Hank (played by Alex Hraur) and Alice Borden (Regina Deavitt) along with his sister Sammy (Bethany Sketchley) struggled to cope with his tragic death from a car accident. As the family’s mourning turned to anger, they received an unexpected letter. Joy, the woman who received Jack’s heart, asked if she could meet them.

The playwright crafted a script that provided a host of challenges for the cast and crew. It began with an unconventional opening: silence and stillness. The show opened to Ms. Petti lying in a hospital bed with Jack standing nearby. Then the scene shifted to Mr. Hraur sitting in a lawn chair at stage left drinking from a thermos. Jack walked over and observed him. Even without the benefit of activity and movement, the performers made the scene a gripping one.

For such an emotional story, the dialog included some humorous quips. Ms. Deavitt and Mr. Hraur delivered the witty banter between husband and wife effectively. Ms. Sketchley made Sammy’s misunderstanding of the word corn witty, also.

The play included nine different scenes and five separate sets. The cast and stage crew managed the quick changes they necessitated without flaw.

The dialog contained the most demanding transitions. Some scenes involving Jack combined the past and present. Throughout most of the show Francis B. Pedersen remained on stage. Mr. Pedersen reacted to the things happening, but didn’t participate. The script included two exceptions. While sitting around the dinner table, the Borden family reminisced about his sense of humor. Mr. Pederson took a place at the table and told a funny story. When Mr. Hraur began talking about an argument the character had with his son, Mr. Pedersen entered the scene and delivered his lines with white hot rage.

Gina Petti brought the psyche of a haunted woman to the stage. She portrayed the character’s myriad emotional states realistically. Ms. Petti became playful when flirting with the man in the café and showed despair as she lay on the couch while drinking wine from the bottle. She cried in the emotional scenes. When reciting the letter Joy sent to Jack’s family, Ms. Petti captured the character’s vulnerability.

Ms. Petti used the scenes opposite her counterparts to demonstrate Joy’s nature. Lisa Croce played the cheery, bubbly Darla; all decked out in her Sarah Palin style glasses. Ms. Petti became reserved and guarded during their time on stage together. The contrast between the two personalities showed why the name “Joy” proved an ironic description of her character.

Ms. Petti played an outstanding scene when her character met Mr. Hraur’s. She managed to show how Joy’s personality shared both Jack’s artistic interests and his father’s bitterness. The priceless look on her face when she asked for “bourbon” will go down in South Jersey theatre lore.

Anyone studying the craft of acting would be well served to watch Francis B. Pedersen during this run. Throughout most of the show, Mr. Pedersen played a ghost; expressing Jack’s feelings non-verbally. His character couldn’t speak or interact with the other performers. Director Walker did make one powerful exception when he placed his hand in Ms. Sketchley’s.

Most of the scenes from Jack’s life began in media res. Mr. Pedersen jumped into the scene and played it naturally. He sounded like he’d already been engaged in the conversation for several minutes.

With the strong performances Ms. Petti and Mr. Pedersen delivered, it’s easy to overlook Regina Devitt’s own powerful performance. Ms. Devitt portrayed a woman struggling with the loss of her son and her husband’s increasing withdraw into alcohol. She served as the force trying to keep the Borden family together. Her portrayal made her character a figure well deserving of empathy.

Alex Hraur showed the father’s descent from grief to anger convincingly. He made the character’s scenes difficult to watch, but yet, he still gave the audience reasons to sympathize with him.

Assistant Director Shelby Tibbetts completed the cast. Ms. Tibbetts played the nurse.

Other members of the Production Staff included: Producer Lindsey Kilchesty, Production Assistants Diana Dohrmann and Pat Marotta, Stage Manager Amy Miele, Technical Producer and Light Designer Bob Beaucheane, Sound Design John Weber and Set Construction Casey Barrett.

Each performance of The Tin Woman includes a talk back. Members of the Gift of Life Donor program will be on-site to address the audience. They will share personal stories regarding organ and tissue donorship.

In the playbill, Director Weber wrote that, “We all have regrets.” Don’t let missing The Tin Woman at Bridge Players Theatre Company be one of them. The show runs through February 22nd.

Frost/Nixon at Burlington County Footlighters’ Second Stage

A flurry of entertainment masquerading as politics has infected the news cycle for the last two years. To ameliorate this madness I opted to watch a theatrical presentation exploring the thin line between politics and show business. Granted, that decision may sound like the drunken whim of a law student out celebrating the only time he ever managed to pass a bar. Nonetheless, I was sober as a judge when I attended the opening night performance of Frost/Nixon at Burlington County Footlighters’ Second Stage this October 5th.

Tim Kirk directed this analysis of two unlikely adversaries. Both men reached vertiginous heights of success at the summit of their professions; one in television, the other as the leader of the free world. Failures crushed each man plummeting them to the ground like modern day Icaruses. But a burning ambition ignited both to strive for that apex again. The only obstacle preventing each man’s return to glory was the other man.

A night of engaging theatre quickly transitioned into a verbal chess match. With Matt Becker in the role of David Frost and Bernard DiCasimirro portraying Richard Nixon it was game on.

Matt Becker did a wonderful job transitioning Frost from a carefree talk show host into a credible journalist. The English accent he adopted reflected the character’s cheery persona. Mr. Becker showed the audience that means of speaking masked a facade. As the show progressed, he brought out the complexities of Frost’s character. I liked the uncomfortable way he avoided the question when Caroline (played by Emily Huddell) accused him of being “sad.”

My favorite scene occurred when Frost received an unexpected phone call. Mr. Becker lamented the poor quality of the interviews and how he’d gambled his career on them. Then an inebriated Nixon contacted him. With a slight slur and an abundance of bravado, Mr. DiCasimirro drew comparisons between the two men. Mr. Becker listened while a poker face for the ages came over his expression. The look captured the character’s determination and frustration. As he sat silently listening to the President’s drunken oration, Mr. Becker drew my attention even better than Mr. DiCasimirro’s brilliant portrayal of the intoxicated former President.

Richard Nixon assured the American people that he was “not a crook.” In the role of the former President, Bernard DiCasimirro sure stole the spotlight. His witty delivery of anecdotes captured both Nixon’s disarming charm and social discomfort. His efforts to rattle Frost before he began the interviews captured the character’s ruthlessness. Through his skillful portrayal he managed to inspire empathy for the disgraced former Chief Executive; transitioning him from a cynical political operator into a vanquished and broken man. Nixon may have let down the American people. Mr. DiCasimirro certainly didn’t let down the audience at Burlington County Footlighters’ Second Stage.

Mr. DiCassimiro captured the character’s essence brilliantly. My favorite moment came when Nixon learned that Frost made the $200,000 down payment for the interview with his own money. Mr. DiCasimirro nonchalantly quipped to an aide: “If I’d known that, I would’ve offered him tea.”

In addition to directing, Tim Kirk played several roles in this piece. He delivered a terrific rendition of negotiator extraordinaire Swifty Lazaar. He played it so well that I had to avoid him after the show. I worried that he’d be able to talk me into spending a fortune on a pair of those Italian shoes Mr. Becker wore.

I usually don’t agree with the inclusion of a narrator in theatrical productions. Frost /Nixon featured two. To my surprise, Mr. Morgan crafted both roles very well. The playwright used them to provide insights into both the Frost and Nixon camps. The audience got to learn about the motivations behind each character’s supporters. The performers who played the narrators animated the text beautifully. Dave Pallas (as Jim Reston) presented the story from the Frost camp. I enjoyed the way brought out the anxiety and frustration with the project. Francis B. Pedersen (Jack Brennan) provided a convincing point-of-view from a dogged Nixon loyalist.

I also credit performers Richard E. Brown II, Alex Levitt, Scott Alexander Ross, Emily Huddell and Eilis Skamarakas for their contributions to the performance.

I had one criticism of the show. The story’s premise defied belief. My mind couldn’t process the idea of a Republican politician talking to a reporter not representing Fox News. I understand that the events in the story occurred 19 years prior to the network’s advent, but still: I would have found a musical version of Tolkien’s The Hobbit performed on an ice skating rink much more believable.

Media and politicians do share some common practices. In addition to sensationalism, both tend to frame issues as zero-sum games. The latter does not provide the best source material for a fun evening of theatre. The cast and crew of Burlington County Footlighters’ Second Stage still did extraordinary work making Frost/Nixon enjoyable. Mr. DiCasimirro’s rendition of Nixon made him into a tragic figure worthy of Shakespeare. Mr. DiCasimirro’s character told Mr. Becker’s, “Only one of us can win. The other ends up in the wilderness.” In staying true to Nixon’s personality, this statement proved inaccurate. The audience walked away the victors from this contest.

Frost/Nixon heads out to the wilderness from Burlington County Footlighters’ Second Stage after October 13th.