The Tin Woman at Bridge Players Theatre Company

The Bridge Players Theatre Company is commemorating Valentine’s Day with heart this year. They are doing so through their presentation of Sean Grennan’s The Tin Woman. Alice Weber directed this absorbing reflection on loss and second chances. Your correspondent attended the Saturday, February 8th performance.

Director Weber has a reputation for selecting thought-provoking projects. The Tin Woman is her most captivating to date.

For those unfamiliar with Mr. Grennan’s drama, think David Lindsey-Abaire’s Rabbit Hole, only with much more tension. Joy (played by Gina Petti) recently received a heart transplant. The experience of coming so close to death led her to reflect upon her life. Failed relationships, a mediocre job and lack of fulfilment made it an unpleasant recollection. She became plagued by guilt that someone had to die so that she could live.

Meanwhile, Jack’s (Francis B. Pedersen’s) family endured their own sorrows. His parents Hank (played by Alex Hraur) and Alice Borden (Regina Deavitt) along with his sister Sammy (Bethany Sketchley) struggled to cope with his tragic death from a car accident. As the family’s mourning turned to anger, they received an unexpected letter. Joy, the woman who received Jack’s heart, asked if she could meet them.

The playwright crafted a script that provided a host of challenges for the cast and crew. It began with an unconventional opening: silence and stillness. The show opened to Ms. Petti lying in a hospital bed with Jack standing nearby. Then the scene shifted to Mr. Hraur sitting in a lawn chair at stage left drinking from a thermos. Jack walked over and observed him. Even without the benefit of activity and movement, the performers made the scene a gripping one.

For such an emotional story, the dialog included some humorous quips. Ms. Deavitt and Mr. Hraur delivered the witty banter between husband and wife effectively. Ms. Sketchley made Sammy’s misunderstanding of the word corn witty, also.

The play included nine different scenes and five separate sets. The cast and stage crew managed the quick changes they necessitated without flaw.

The dialog contained the most demanding transitions. Some scenes involving Jack combined the past and present. Throughout most of the show Francis B. Pedersen remained on stage. Mr. Pedersen reacted to the things happening, but didn’t participate. The script included two exceptions. While sitting around the dinner table, the Borden family reminisced about his sense of humor. Mr. Pederson took a place at the table and told a funny story. When Mr. Hraur began talking about an argument the character had with his son, Mr. Pedersen entered the scene and delivered his lines with white hot rage.

Gina Petti brought the psyche of a haunted woman to the stage. She portrayed the character’s myriad emotional states realistically. Ms. Petti became playful when flirting with the man in the café and showed despair as she lay on the couch while drinking wine from the bottle. She cried in the emotional scenes. When reciting the letter Joy sent to Jack’s family, Ms. Petti captured the character’s vulnerability.

Ms. Petti used the scenes opposite her counterparts to demonstrate Joy’s nature. Lisa Croce played the cheery, bubbly Darla; all decked out in her Sarah Palin style glasses. Ms. Petti became reserved and guarded during their time on stage together. The contrast between the two personalities showed why the name “Joy” proved an ironic description of her character.

Ms. Petti played an outstanding scene when her character met Mr. Hraur’s. She managed to show how Joy’s personality shared both Jack’s artistic interests and his father’s bitterness. The priceless look on her face when she asked for “bourbon” will go down in South Jersey theatre lore.

Anyone studying the craft of acting would be well served to watch Francis B. Pedersen during this run. Throughout most of the show, Mr. Pedersen played a ghost; expressing Jack’s feelings non-verbally. His character couldn’t speak or interact with the other performers. Director Walker did make one powerful exception when he placed his hand in Ms. Sketchley’s.

Most of the scenes from Jack’s life began in media res. Mr. Pedersen jumped into the scene and played it naturally. He sounded like he’d already been engaged in the conversation for several minutes.

With the strong performances Ms. Petti and Mr. Pedersen delivered, it’s easy to overlook Regina Devitt’s own powerful performance. Ms. Devitt portrayed a woman struggling with the loss of her son and her husband’s increasing withdraw into alcohol. She served as the force trying to keep the Borden family together. Her portrayal made her character a figure well deserving of empathy.

Alex Hraur showed the father’s descent from grief to anger convincingly. He made the character’s scenes difficult to watch, but yet, he still gave the audience reasons to sympathize with him.

Assistant Director Shelby Tibbetts completed the cast. Ms. Tibbetts played the nurse.

Other members of the Production Staff included: Producer Lindsey Kilchesty, Production Assistants Diana Dohrmann and Pat Marotta, Stage Manager Amy Miele, Technical Producer and Light Designer Bob Beaucheane, Sound Design John Weber and Set Construction Casey Barrett.

Each performance of The Tin Woman includes a talk back. Members of the Gift of Life Donor program will be on-site to address the audience. They will share personal stories regarding organ and tissue donorship.

In the playbill, Director Weber wrote that, “We all have regrets.” Don’t let missing The Tin Woman at Bridge Players Theatre Company be one of them. The show runs through February 22nd.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s