Theater Review – The Who’s Tommy at Burlington County Footlighters

From “behind blue eyes” I watched the cast of Burlington County Footlighters “join together” for their production of The Who’s Tommy. I felt the “sensation” of being a kid on “Christmas” at the “welcome” opportunity to watch a theatrical encomium to Pete Townshend’s masterpiece. I love The Who’s music; especially the 1969 album that inspired the show. Why? “I don’t know myself.” “I can’t explain” the reason, but Tommy is still one of my favorites. “Is it in my head?” “You better you bet.” “It’s not enough” to tell me that “the music must change” and I should listen to a “new song”. I don’t care if “too much of anything” is bad for me. “I’m free” to turn on to this classic rock masterpiece as often as I like. I started “shakin’ all over” at the chance to see the first Rock Opera performed live on stage as a musical.

“It’s hard” to put on a production this complex. Director Jessica Sawyer did a phenomenal job turning “another tricky day” at the theater into a “success story”. Footlighters has a history of staging high tech productions such as Bonnie and Clyde and Avenue Q. Tommy featured many similarities. A movie played in the background during much of the show. The cast and crew brought out and put away bulky props such as a bed and pinball machine. They executed all of this while singing and dancing in-synch with a live band (conducted by Cameron Stringham). I marveled that they performed all these feats flawlessly.

As if these variables didn’t challenge the cast, Tommy featured a very unusual story to convey. Captain Walker (played by Paul Huntington) disappeared during the Second World War. Proving the old adage that “love ain’t for keeping”, Mrs. Walker (played by Angela Rose Longo) remarried. At this point the captain returned to catch his wife with her new spouse. In a fit of jealousy, Captain Walker killed the new suitor in front of four year old Tommy. (Colin Becker)

Tommy entered a catatonic state; becoming deaf, dumb and blind. This is where the show became really interesting. “Imagine a man” who witnessed such a scene as a child. I enjoyed watching the interplay between the adult Tommy (played by Ryan PJ Mulholland) and the younger version of the character played by Colin Becker. They performed an outstanding duet on “See Me, Feel Me, Touch Me”.

Tommy proved a tough role for all three of his incarnations. (Aaron Levan played the ten year old one.) Sometimes it entailed staring straight ahead with a blank look; on one occasion while being slapped in the face. I have to give Mr. Becker and Mr. Levan credit: I don’t remember seeing them blink the entire show. The remainder of the time Tommy required singing songs written by a visionary songwriter. I’ve heard Who lead singer Roger Daltrey struggle with “See Me, Feel Me, Touch Me” and “I’m Free”. I give a lot of credit to Mr. Mulholland for his perfect diction and intonation on these tracks.

This show featured many performers in difficult roles. Brian Gensel turned in a fantastic rendition of the sadistic “Cousin Kevin”. He and the Ensemble also did an unforgettable job running around Mr. Mulholland singing “Tommy, Can You Hear Me?” Eileen Lucarini (aka Lena Luke) played and sang the Acid Queen role as well as Tina Turner and Patti Labelle.

Angela Rose Longo’s mellifluous singing is always a pleasure to hear. Last year I watched her perform the role of Rosemary in How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying.” I remember her tender rendition of “Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm.” Ballads suit Ms. Longo’s vocal style exceptionally well. She really shone in the mellow portion of “1951” and the soft recitation of the line “Tommy, can you hear me” in this show.

Paul Huntington impressed me the most at the beginning of the show. He acted out Captain Walker’s war time service in unison with a movie. At one point he even changed into a different uniform on stage. That showed phenomenal poise in front of a live audience.

Who purists would say there’s no “substitute” for Keith Moon in the role of Uncle Ernie. Al Krier convinced me otherwise. I liked his giddy, high-energy prance around the stage while singing the “Tommy’s Holiday Camp” number. I recall that during the 1989 Tommy tour Pete Townshend complimented Elton John on his red suit. I found the bright green suit Mr. Krier wore much more unique.

I also give Lindsey Krier credit for the exceptional choreography. In her role as Sally Simpson, Ms. Krier brought me much closer to the action than I’d expected. The character fell off the stage in front of me. Mr. Mulholland and the Ensemble congregated a foot or so from my seat and continued performing the song. That’s one thing I really admire about Footlighters: they utilize the whole room for their productions. As an audience member I appreciated feeling like a part of the show.

That’s why I really enjoyed the performance’s conclusion. Mr. Mulholland and the cast led the audience in a “Pinball Wizard” sing along. I have to acknowledge that their crooning sounded more “pure and easy” than mine. I still had a lot of fun joining in.

For the first time in all my visits to Footlighters I may have witnessed a technical glitch. To the “naked eye” it seemed like there were lines on the video screen at times. It could have been a “trick of the light”, though. At any rate, it didn’t cause me any “melancholia” with respect to the performance.

If I may borrow a song title from the last Who album: “We Got a Hit.” This show was a “bargain” at under $20.” “Relay” the message to friends and family. You can “cry if you want”, but the final showing is on May 21st. “Run, run, run” to Burlington County Footlighters to see the Who’s music brought to life. I’d watch this cast’s performance “anyway, anyhow, anywhere.”

 

 

 

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